Davies Auto – Chronicles

Let’s say you move from wherever you purchased your new vehicle, and the dealership is no longer near where you live. Or maybe your dealership closes, and the next closest dealership isn’t so close after all. Or you buy a new vehicle, but you have already sustained an excellent working relationship with another auto shop. No matter what the situation is, warranty work on your vehicle may not be as restrictive as it seems. There were over 16 million cars sold in 2007, and most new vehicles come with a warranty for maintenance either for a period of time or a period of miles. While there may not be many serious issues with newer vehicles, the warranties can and should come in handy with regular maintenance and smaller but important issues that may in fact come up.Do you want to learn more? Visit Davies Auto.

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This article discusses what to do if indeed you find yourself in this position. A few things to consider with warranties since the dealer is separate from the company – if you have a problem not covered by the normal warranty, see if it is covered by a federally mandated warranty. Some of these go up to 100,000 miles, but dealers don’t always admit that they exist. See your owner’s manual for details – and if you don’t have an owner’s manual, borrow one for your model year. Most makers sometimes authorize repairs after the warranty is over, depending on the circumstances and the staffer’s mood. While dealers can do this in some cases, few will take the risk. Dealers may think something is not covered when it really is.
One common misconception is that you don’t have to take your vehicle to the a dealership to have something taken care of that is covered and approved under the warranty. You can take your car to any certified mechanic (ASE), and it will not void the manufacturer’s warranty. Of course, before deciding whether or not to go to the dealership or an independent service shop, think about the repairs and the budget you have. Many dealerships tend to add or recommend services which may not be necessary at that exact time. Private auto repair facilities are more likely to provide the necessary services without trying to push any other products closely associated with the car company. Auto repair shops other than the dealership can still communicate with the car company to discuss the warranty coverage to see if it approved. Also, similarly, for work not under warranty like routine oil changes or tire rotations, private service shops have less overhead costs making it less expensive than a dealership. This will not void your warranty in most cases. However, you should keep records and receipts for any of these services.

Used vehicles sometimes also come with limited warranties which do not always require repair to be done by the dealership. State laws hold dealers responsible if cars they sell don’t meet reasonable quality standards. These obligations are called implied warranties – unspoken, unwritten promises from the seller to the buyer. However, dealers in most states can use the words “as is” or “with all faults” in a written notice to buyers to eliminate implied warranties. There is no specified time period for implied warranties. If the manufacturer’s warranty still is in effect, the dealer may include it in the “systems covered/duration” section of the Buyers Guide. To make sure you can take advantage of the coverage, ask the dealer for the car’s warranty documents. Verify the information (what’s covered, expiration date/miles, and necessary paperwork) by calling the manufacturer’s zone office. Make sure you have the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) when you call. Like a warranty, a service contract provides repair and/or maintenance for a specific period. But warranties are included in the price of a product, while service contracts cost extra and are sold separately.